Brain Health Fellowship - Request For Applications

From:  Joseph Harbison.
Head of Discipline of Medical Gerontology, Trinity College Dublin Consultant Stroke Physician and Geriatrician, St James's Hospital Dublin National Clinical Lead for Stroke (Geriatrics)

Dear Colleague,

I am writing to give you advance notice of a set of potential international fellowship opportunities for young clinicians, researchers, and practitioners from across fields with an interest in brain health. Coursework for these residential fellowships will begin in the summer of 2016.

We are contacting established leaders in the field, such as yourself, to request recommendations for potential candidates for these fellowships, and to ask you to share with potential applicants the attached Request For Applications (RFA).

The project will be co-directed by Bruce MIller at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Ian Robertson at University of Dublin, Trinity College (TCD), and will provide a rich, action-based, interdisciplinary learning environment for cohorts of future leaders in the global response to dementia and related disorders.

The WHO has estimated that the number of people living with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment will triple by 2050, as the worldwide population grows and people live longer. The consequences of this for societies, economies, and care systems, and families will be enormous.

The purpose of these new fellowships is to mentor talented individuals at an early stage in their career and nurture them to become leaders who will meet the challenges of global brain health for future decades. Successful applicants will have excelled in the early years of their training and will have your full support to become future leaders.

We envision two types of funding support:

1.Two-year fellowships open to a wide range of individuals early in their career, including, but not limited to: physicians (e.g. psychiatrists, neurologists, geriatricians, and others), researchers (neuroscientists, psychologists, social scientists, and others) and other health professionals (nurses, social workers, clinical psychologists, therapists, and others). Candidates will have the opportunity to experience and participate in training in a wide range of activities related to brain health, and to undertake funded projects of relevance to their specialist interests.

2. Shorter-term scholarships that allow individuals from any field and at any stage of their career to gain expertise in specific areas and conduct focused projects related to brain health. For example, journalists and activists might take three-to-twelve months immersed in the environments at UCSF or TCD to adapt innovations in care, and generate articles and advocacy campaigns inspiring by their learning.
Final details for the fellowships will be confirmed shortly, with information on the shorter-term scholarships available in early 2016. For now, we encourage qualified candidates to review the attached RFA and submit an expression of interest as soon as possible.

More information can be obtained from Dr. Joe Harbison at JHARBISO@tcd.ie<mailto:JHARBISO@tcd.ie> or Dr. Victor Valcour at victor.valcour@ucsf.edu<mailto:victor.valcour@ucsf.edu>

Please share this information as widely as you can to diverse groups of individuals in your networks and university. We are grateful for your support.

Sincerely,
Joseph Harbison.
Head of Discipline of Medical Gerontology, Trinity College Dublin Consultant Stroke Physician and Geriatrician, St James's Hospital Dublin National Clinical Lead for Stroke (Geriatrics)

Phone: +353 1 896 3555
Fax: +353 1 896 3407